Courtesy: Mesh Architects

The acrobatic structure spirals over an open air performance space in the water.

The “Wave Pier” features a dynamic, twisting form that swoops up effortlessly out of the water and curves back gracefully like a trained dolphin or roller coaster. Designed by Mesh Architects in collaboration with BIG, among others (Martha Schwarz Partners, Thornton Thomasetti, Parsons Brinchkerhoff, HR&A and CC&A), the “Wave” combines all manner of recreation and program in one daring loop that juts over Tampa Bay.

The proposal is meant to house a new cultural center for the new St. Petersburg Pier. Sandwiched between the curving concrete surfaces and behind whirling bands of glass are a pavilion, exhibition and event spaces, and banquet hall to host galas, parties, and fundraisers. The acrobatic structure spirals over an open air performance/concert space (forming a rock-climbing wall in the process), before gently sloping downward into the water to create an artificial, ”pseudo”-beach on which visitors may recline or tan. The main artery connecting the complex to the shore becomes a vast boardwalk surreally bounded on all sides by the deepening waters with magnificent vistas of the bay and the city skyline beyond.






All photos courtesy of MESH Architects.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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