Courtesy: Mesh Architects

The acrobatic structure spirals over an open air performance space in the water.

The “Wave Pier” features a dynamic, twisting form that swoops up effortlessly out of the water and curves back gracefully like a trained dolphin or roller coaster. Designed by Mesh Architects in collaboration with BIG, among others (Martha Schwarz Partners, Thornton Thomasetti, Parsons Brinchkerhoff, HR&A and CC&A), the “Wave” combines all manner of recreation and program in one daring loop that juts over Tampa Bay.

The proposal is meant to house a new cultural center for the new St. Petersburg Pier. Sandwiched between the curving concrete surfaces and behind whirling bands of glass are a pavilion, exhibition and event spaces, and banquet hall to host galas, parties, and fundraisers. The acrobatic structure spirals over an open air performance/concert space (forming a rock-climbing wall in the process), before gently sloping downward into the water to create an artificial, ”pseudo”-beach on which visitors may recline or tan. The main artery connecting the complex to the shore becomes a vast boardwalk surreally bounded on all sides by the deepening waters with magnificent vistas of the bay and the city skyline beyond.






All photos courtesy of MESH Architects.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo-illustration of several big-box retail stores.
    Equity

    After the Retail Apocalypse, Prepare for the Property Tax Meltdown

    Big-box retailers nationwide are slashing their property taxes through a legal loophole known as "dark store theory." For the towns that rely on that revenue, this could be a disaster.

  2. A photo of a mural in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
    Life

    Stop Complaining About Your Rent and Move to Tulsa, Suggests Tulsa

    In an effort to beef up the city’s tech workforce, the George Kaiser Family Foundation is offering $10,000, free rent, and other perks to remote workers who move to Tulsa for a year.

  3. A photo of a small small house in San Francisco's Noe Valley that sold for $1.8 million in 2014.
    Equity

    Why Cities Must Tackle Single-Family Zoning

    As cities wake up to their housing crises, the problems with single-family-home residential zoning will become too egregious to ignore.

  4. Graphic designer Burton Kramer thumbs through the pages of the CBC design standards manual he created.
    Design

    How Canada Discovered Its Visual Identity

    A documentary by Vancouver-based graphic designer Greg Durrell explores the surprisingly rich history behind the nation’s postwar design culture.

  5. A man walks down the Zeedjik.
    Equity

    How a Dutch Housing Agency Rescued an Amsterdam Street From the Drug Trade

    Frustrated by rampant heroin trade, residents of the street Zeedijk forced a public-private real-estate partnership to protect the street while preventing community displacement.