Simon Devitt

In Auckland, New Zealand, a micro-theater is grafted onto an existing stoop, transforming stairs into seats.

The diminishing (some might say, deterioration) of public social interaction at the "hands" of smartphones and other gadgets has prompted an ever-growing tide of reaction from architects, designers, and other would-be social engineers. OH.NO.SUMO, an experimental design collective from Auckland, New Zealand, decided to get in on the game with a parasitic movie theater that turns a busy street corner into an pop-up cienma.

‘Stairway Cinema’ was built as a haven for city-dwellers, either in transit or idly waiting for a bus or to meet friends. The micro-theater is grafted onto an existing stoop such that the stairs become seats (for up to seven people) and films, selected by viewers, are projected onto the canopy while pedestrians pass below. The cinema doubles as a refuge from rain, and as an incubator of random social encounters.

Photos: Simon Devitt

Videos are chosen by viewers through social media

The project aims to encourage people to trade private screens for one somewhat more public, as the project uses social media to reintroduce interaction into the physical public realm. But unless the Stairway Cinema can be replicated across the globe, keeping public spaces vital and vivacious is going to be an uphill battle.

Photos: Simon Devitt



Photos: Simon Devitt



The cinema was built onto an existing stoop

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    Octopuses Are Urbanists, Too

    Scientists were surprised to find that this smart and solitary species had built a cephalopod city. Why?

  2. Transportation

    A Troubled Bike Share Takes a Time-Out

    After thefts and vandalism, Baltimore’s new bike share system has suspended operations for a month.  

  3. Equity

    This Startup Helps You Buy a House (If You Hand Over Your Airbnb Income)

    For buyers in hot real-estate markets, a new kind of mortgage offered by a company called Loftium might offer a way to purchase a home.

  4. Maps

    How Human Activity Is Changing Animal Migration Patterns

    A new book maps how animals navigate a world heavily altered by urban development and climate change.

  5. Rescue crews and observers on top of the rubble from a collapsed building that fell in the Condesa neighborhood of Mexico City.
    Environment

    A Brigade of Architects and Engineers Rushed to Assess Earthquake Damage in Mexico City

    La Casa del Arquitecto became the headquarters for highly skilled urbanists looking to help and determine why some buildings suffered more spectacularly than others.