Dzmitry Samal

Wear the sidewalk on your wrist.

Is there enough concrete in your life? If not, this watch could be a great move - it's the latest in city-themed accessories.

Paris-based designer Dzmitry Samal has designed a new line of watches to capture the spirit of the city - a rather expensive city, at $1,200, but the kind of city that could break the ice at parties, and maybe even a glass or two. The housing is concrete; the glass sapphire; the hands tiny modernist skyscrapers. On models 1-4, the face shows a cubic facade reminiscent of the Der Scutt's Trump Tower on 5th Avenue, overlaid with bold colored lines suggesting an irrational street grid. The symmetrical face on models 5-6 and 7-8 recalls a Spanish colonial town center or perhaps the perfect Sim City game. The strap is black rubber, likewise decorated with a gray street grid. Paris, perhaps?

Samal's vision speaks for itself: "Watchmaking, as I see, is more than just a time measuring mechanism. It is the main male jewellery and should reflect the personality and strength of its owner. I chose concrete, a noble, modern, honest and robust material, the stuff our megapolises are made of."

No word yet on how much the watch weighs.

Images: Samal Design

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