The cartographers over at Floating Sheep track tweets on both topics.

From the terrific cartographers at Floating Sheep comes this map of church vs. beer. It's based on geo–tagged tweets referencing either in America between June 22 and 28. Blue is for beer, red is for church.

Via Floating Sheep



Just glancing at the map: beer is pretty well distributed. Church is much more heavily concentrated in the South. Or as the Floating Sheepers explain it:

This map clearly illustrates some fairly big regional divides (more on that in a bit) but it is worth drilling down a bit to see how this plays out at the local level.  San Francisco has the largest margin in favor of "beer" tweets (191 compared to 46 for "church") with Boston (Suffolk county) running a close second. Los Angeles has the distinction of containing the most tweets overall (busy, busy thumbs in Southern California). In contrast, Dallas, Texas wins the FloatingSheep award for most geo-tagged tweets about "church" with 178 compared to only 83 about "beer."

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