YouTube/HatTrickDesign

The Royal Mail unveils its newest Games-related stamps.

To commemorate the official beginning of the Olympics today, the Royal Mail is releasing a new set of stamps featuring four athletic events that blend into four different architectural icons in London.

The stamps show a cyclist along side the London Eye, a fencer next to Tower Bridge, track runners beside Olympic Stadium a diver juxtaposed against the Tate Modern.

The actions of the athletes parallel the architectural forms of famous buildings of the city. While the athletes are not immediately recognizable, they are all members of Team GB and scheduled to compete in the Games.


Courtesy Hat-Trick Design

In an interview with Fast Company Design, Gareth Howat of Hat-Trick gave some insight into the design process. He said the most complicated stamp to create was the fencer and Tower Bridge. “The right angle of attack for the lunge was shot over and over to make sure we had the right angle and exact form of the fencer and her arm," he said. "Once we had got that, it was a case of briefing the architectural photographer to shoot Tower Bridge from the correct angle so they ‘joined.’

As the ultimate declaration of approval, mayor Boris Johnson praised the stamps in a way only Boris Johnson could, saying yesterday:

Even fleet-footed Hermes himself would hang up his winged sandals and send his letters through Royal Mail if he saw the quality of these beautiful stamps.

The Royal Mail has been producing various Olympics-related stamp sets since London won its bid in 2005. The other currently available sets can be viewed on their site.

H/T Fast Company

About the Author

Mark Byrnes
Mark Byrnes

Mark Byrnes is a senior associate editor at CityLab who writes about design, history, and photography.

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