Courtesy: Simone Simonelli

A multi-purpose piece for micro living.

Let’s be honest, decent amounts of space can be hard to come by, especially for city dwellers. While it may be at a premium, the lack of the space presents designers with unique opportunities to stretch the limits of their craft or practice, expanding their field of inquiry and experimentation.

The Maisonette (meaning "small house" in French) series designed by Simone Simonelli is a quirky collection of mobile furniture that meets the needs of any micro-living situation. The collection, which aims to focus on practicality, is a three piece set of contemporary, functional furniture.

Maisonette Series by Simone Simonelli

Made out of solid adler wood and iron rod structures the three-piece set includes a stand/mini wardrobe, a cart/table and a basket/tray. The clean geometry of each piece is accented with blocks of color set against the dark iron rods, which lend to the functionality of each piece. The rods allow the shelving unit to be used as a rack, the tray becomes a basket and the wheeled table is converted into a cart.

Maisonette Series by Simone Simonelli
Maisonette Series by Simone Simonelli

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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