Some intriguing scenes from the world's largest museum and research complex.

Paris has the Louvre, New York has the Met and Washington, D.C., has the Smithsonian. It's 19 museums and galleries strong, making it the largest "museum and research complex" in the world. Below, scenes of some of the museum's more intriguing works, by Kevin Lamarque of Reuters:

A visitor looks at an exhibit called "Eye of the Storm" at the Smithsonian Institution's American Indian Museum.


Lines in the ceiling form a shadow pattern on the floor of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. The museum maintains the largest collection of historic air and spacecraft in the world.



A plane is a seen in the background as visitors walk through the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum.



Visitors to the National Gallery of Art pass between the East and West Buildings via Multiverse, the largest and most complex light sculpture created by American artist Leo Villareal. The work features approximately 41,000 computer-programmed LED nodes.



A child points up at an exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution's American Indian Museum. Behind them is a work titled "For Life in all Directions."


 

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