That's how much New York's 4th of July fireworks cost, according to Fox Business.

It's a big price tag, but $6 million is what some estimate Macy's pays for New York City's annual 4th of July show. According to Fox Business, workers set off 1,600 shells per minute (more than three times the average of the entire local community show).

There are 14,000 shows across the country every July 4th. Costs range from $2,000 to $7,000 for a short, simple small town display up into the hundreds of thousands of dollars for big city shows (with music, computer coordination and larger shells).

Perhaps the most complicated bureaucratic show is Washington D.C.'s show on the Capitol. As Fox Business writes:

Any time you're planning to blow up an estimated 33 tons of pyrotechnics in 18 minutes in the nation's capital, there's bound to be a few agencies involved. Throughout the yearlong planning process, the FBI, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Federal Aviation Administration, Secret Service, D.C. fire and police departments, National Parks Service and its police department, and PBS all coordinate with Pyro Shows to turn over every possible stone of safety, legislation and presentation.

"A lot of people have their fingers in the pie because it's a very public pie," Hill says.

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