London's most athletic vermin run the torch in this charming animation.

Now here's an Olympic event I would actually watch: The sprightly vermin of London racing to get a torch to the finish line.

Except in this case, the "torch" is a lit cigarette or a dry twig. And the celebration at the "finish line" might get a person jailed in most countries. It makes you question the vermin's motive having the torch relay in the first place is it for the love of sport, or a psychopathic mission to destroy a London city block?

This grimy-cute production, a mix of real footage and cartoons, was co-directed by European animators Amael Isnard and Leo Bridle for London's deliciously named Beakus animation studio. Allow Beakus to explain the meaning of this animalistic cinema:

The short beautifully shows us what's going on down the backstreets of London during the build up to the Games, where vermin are also inspired to take part. Shot around London, sometimes from the top of a 5-metre pole, and featuring an array of messed-up animated vermin, the film pokes fun at the Olympics and it's so-called 'inclusivity' dogma.

I'm still trying to figure out, however, just what type of vermin that is motoring around in the trash-dotted canal. A giant carp? A snakehead (does London even have snakeheads)? Whatever: It would probably taste just as good as rat on the plate.

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