Courtesy: Tom Dixon

$3,900 will get you a room in this renovated tower, complete with a fire escape walk-up.

Water towers make for great landmarks, popping out of the urban landscape at surprising moments. Often situated on rooftops to make sure the homes and apartments below have adequate water pressure, water towers are associated with dwellings. But Tom Dixon, apparently a ‘design research studio,’ has made the association even closer with Tower House which, as its name suggests, is a water tower converted into a house.

The sixty-foot tall tower in North Kensington, London, is accessible through a fire escape-like stair running up from street level. Perched on concrete stilts, the tower has been clad in wood, with windows punched through. The new home - which reminds us of the Chateau d’Eau, another water tower-flip - features three levels, and is surprisingly spacious at 23 feet in diameter. It comes stocked with a kitchen, living room, and bathroom on the first floor, two bedrooms and a bathroom on the second, and a large living space with access to a roof terrace on the third.

Currently, the rooms are for rent at $3,900 per month, which is understandable considering that the developer will have put in more than $1.25 million into the project by the time it’s complete (they plan to add two more stories). Our only question is, where did they put all the water?







All photos courtesy of Tom Dixon.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    Amazon Whittles Down List of HQ2 Contenders to 20 Finalists

    The list skews toward larger cities and metropolitan areas along the Eastern corridor, stretching as far north as Toronto and as far south as Miami. And it looks like some of the economic incentives might be paying off.

  2. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.

  3. A man sits in a room alone.
    Equity

    The World's First Minister of Loneliness

    Britain just created an entirely new ministry to tackle this serious public health concern.

  4. A small accessory dwelling unit—known as an ADU—is attached to an older single-family home in a Portland, Oregon, neighborhood.
    Design

    The Granny Flats Are Coming

    A new book argues that the U.S. is about to see more accessory dwelling units and guides homeowners on how to design and build them.

  5. Transportation

    On Paris Metro, Drug Abuse Reaches a Boiling Point

    The transit workers’ union says some stations on Line 12 are too dangerous to stop at. What will the city do?