Courtesy: Tom Dixon

$3,900 will get you a room in this renovated tower, complete with a fire escape walk-up.

Water towers make for great landmarks, popping out of the urban landscape at surprising moments. Often situated on rooftops to make sure the homes and apartments below have adequate water pressure, water towers are associated with dwellings. But Tom Dixon, apparently a ‘design research studio,’ has made the association even closer with Tower House which, as its name suggests, is a water tower converted into a house.

The sixty-foot tall tower in North Kensington, London, is accessible through a fire escape-like stair running up from street level. Perched on concrete stilts, the tower has been clad in wood, with windows punched through. The new home - which reminds us of the Chateau d’Eau, another water tower-flip - features three levels, and is surprisingly spacious at 23 feet in diameter. It comes stocked with a kitchen, living room, and bathroom on the first floor, two bedrooms and a bathroom on the second, and a large living space with access to a roof terrace on the third.

Currently, the rooms are for rent at $3,900 per month, which is understandable considering that the developer will have put in more than $1.25 million into the project by the time it’s complete (they plan to add two more stories). Our only question is, where did they put all the water?







All photos courtesy of Tom Dixon.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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