Chris Reynolds/Flickr

Who doesn't want to ride around Australia inside a marine predator's gaping maw?

There's a revolution coming in bicycling fashion, and style-conscious riders better be wise: You are nobody on the trail unless you're peeping out from the flaming maw of the world's most terrifying marine predator.

This truth was unveiled in June at Vivid Sydney, a gathering of light artists that had the city casting a refulgent beam into the night sky like an exposed reactor core at Chernobyl. When they weren't making the Sydney Opera House fall to the ground in broken shards, the artists were wheeling around bicycles with bespoke canopies that made them look like tremendous anglerfish, those benthic monsters that sucker in prey with their glowing fleshy dangles.

These extremely toothy rides were the work of Group D Creative Collective, a seemingly new arts community based in New South Wales. The digital-printing company that helped spawn the Fish Bikes has a bunch of wonderful photos of them in action, including one of them passing under a "No Fishing" sign. And here are a few more:


(Andy Wana/Flickr)

(Chris Reynolds/Flickr)
(Beau Giles/Flickr)

The concept art looks torn from the monster catalog of Ed "Big Daddy" Roth:

(Group D Collective/Facebook)

And while the role between human and fish seemed reversed at the festival, with creatures of the deep suddenly slithering around topside, there was also something vaguely humanoid lurking in the deep. Jeepers, will this haunt your dreams:

(Andy Wana/Flickr)

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