With a bit of CGI help, we now know what it would look like if New York City was one big amusement park.

Wheeee! There's an amusement park right in the middle of New York City!

But Times Square gets old pretty quick. So let's get even more carnival stuff in there pronto, with a little computer-aided help from Argentinian director Fernando Livschitz and his company, Black Sheep Films.

This filmmaker's created a wacko vision of a Manhattan overrun by the rides at Coney Island. It's a sneaky advertisement for Luna Park, but it works well on its own as a ridiculous cinema-dream. Spinning around on a swing carousel at 1,000 feet high – why haven't the building managers of the Chrysler Building already thought of this? (Oh, right.)

Livschitz is either a former carny or has spent fun times among that noble breed. This is the third video he's spawned featuring amusement rides on the loose in the big city. Previously, he imagined an "Inception Park" tossing screaming riders above Buenos Aires. He's also released into the collective consciousness the world's most terrifying escalator. Seriously, there would be a pile-up at the bottom of that staircase of people frantically trying not to be eaten by the clown.

While serious architecture and Tilt-A-Whirls are unlikely to meet in the near future, it's enjoyable seeing what could be accomplished by the kooky union. And really, half the carnivalization is already done, what with New York's supply of candied nuts, gruesome hotdogs and freaks.

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