Reuters

See garbage and cling wrap molded into sculpture.

The Bosso Fataka are guerrilla artists, shaping the world around them with garbage and cling wrap. The four-person team has taken to the streets of Berlin to wrap and shape sculptures out of the urban detritus before them. According to Reuters:

Cling wrap gives the rubbish they use as components for their sculptures a bodily shape that allows the onlooker to perceive the creation as a whole, melting pieces of trash into an entity without concealing the individual parts.  Humor plays an important role in their work.

It’s a humor that is subtle and weird, sometimes thought-provoking, but never meant to please. “Street art is always egocentric,” one member of the group said. “We don’t care if you like it. We just do it.”

Below, a video and photos of their work, by Reuters photographer Tom Peter.

A sculpture by the street art group Bosso Fataka is seen at a street in Berlin.
A member of the Bosso Fataka street art group works on a sculpture at a building in Berlin.
Members of the Bosso Fataka street art group work on a sculpture at a building in Berlin.


A man cycles past a sculpture by the Bosso Fataka street art group in Berlin.
 

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