Adi Kalina

Chairs with umbrellas and desks invite you to hang around.

 

Jerusalem-based designer Adi Kalina has come up with a set of urban street furniture for the laptop and coffee enthusiast. Kalina noticed that often, street furniture is geared toward discouraging prolonged occupation, whether by the homeless or the pedestrian in need of a rest. Traditionally, it has had to balance comfort with a more prosaic concern: making sure that people don’t stay too long so that others might have a chance to sit. Kalina’s work is geared primarily toward comfort and prolonged occupation, with the idea that urban spaces filled with people tend to attract more people and become more lively. 

Thus, the ‘Outdoor Office’ series of chairs feature ergonomic backs, sun-screens overhead, and a tray for holding coffee cups, computers, or books. The form of the chairs is unsettlingly reminiscent of a cobra’s hood, though the overall fluidity of the design would add interest to many urban settings.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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