Level one: Eat three people.

Maybe you should stop reading on the way to work. For the second time in two weeks, we've seen a Dutch designer find inspiration in the banality of his commute.

This time, the designer is Daniel Disselkoen, a student at the Royal Academy of Art in the Hague. Disselkoen has been taking the same tram to school for four years, so he invented a game, called Maneater, to be played on the tram window. The goal is to adjust the position of your head so that you watch the monster sticker on the window eat the heads of pedestrians. It's a sort of do-it-yourself Pac-Man, with instructions on the back of the seat in front of you.

Below, Disselkoen's game in action. Level one: eat three people.

Top image courtesy Daniel Disselkoen.

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