Worshippers packed mosques and partied outside to celebrate the end of Ramadan.

Ramadan wrapped up this week with Eid-al-Fitr. Here's an anecdote from Mogadishu, courtesy of the Los Angeles Times:

When Faisa Abdi Salad heard fireworks and gunshots in Mogadishu at the sighting of the new moon that signals the end of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, she thought the city was under attack. She said it took a while for it to sink in that the guns and explosions were marking a celebration, not violence.

Other cities were not so lucky. In Afghanistan, a pair of brothers and three NATO members were killed in attacks timed to the holiday. Syrians traditionally end the fast with purchases of sweets and new clothes. Instead, Damascus residents were stuck inside, while President Assad made a rare public appearance at a mosque.  

But at least one battle was much more light-hearted. Every year, Muslim performers compete to put out the record that sells the most copies during Ramadan. This year, an Egyptian singer (Rami Sabri) burst back onto the scene after four years off. He vied for the top spot against Syrian Asala Nasri and Lebanese performer Nancy Ajram.

Below photos from cities around the world.

People visit the Spiral Minaret of the Great Mosque as they celebrate Eid al-Fitr in Samarra. (Reuters)
People visit the Spiral Minaret of the Great Mosque as they celebrate Eid al-Fitr in Samarra. (Reuters)
A man waits for Eid al-Fitr mass prayers to begin at Kashmiri Takiya Jame mosque in Kathmandu. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)



A balloon seller takes a nap in front of the closed shops on the occasion of Eid-al-Fitr in Delhi. (Mansi Thapliyal/Reuters)


Tunisian children play in a park during the second day of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, in Tunis. (Zoubeir Souissi/Reuters)

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