A designer in Milan creates mobile mini-parks.

Would you be willing to sacrifice your parking space for a little piece of urban green space? Designer and ‘creative problem solver’ Matteo Cibic is hoping to persuade you with his current experiment the Tree Trolley. It's a modular and mobile mini-park that takes over the city’s empty parking spaces.

Cibic, who’s lived in Milan for a decade now, says he has yet to find a suitable shading tree to sit under–not entirely surprising considering the city’s lack of public green spaces. Cibic’s Tree Trolley allows for a mobile parklet that can be parked in any urban parking space, while also servicing the community. The benefits of the urban trolley are great, reducing urban smog by replacing private hotspots with one operating wifi hotspot that can be accessed by everyone in the area.

The trolley and can serve as a mobile work space–it’s equipped with a USB charger–while also making neighborhoods safe by providing light and help buttons. The ideal situation for Cibic’s rentable Tree Trolley is to split the costs amongst neighborhoods, creating a network of mobile green spaces for residents to enjoy. Read more about the project over at smart urban stage, plus a Q&A with Cibic and Inhabitat founder/editor Jill Fehrenbacher.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

 

About the Author

Ashley Wells

Ashley Wells is a Brooklyn-based intern at Architizer.

Most Popular

  1. Design

    The Military Declares War on Sprawl

    The Pentagon thinks better designed, more walkable bases can help curb obesity and improve troops’ fitness.

  2. Modest two-bedroom apartments are unaffordable to full-time minimum wage workers in every U.S. county.
    Maps

    Rent Is Affordable to Low-Wage Workers in Exactly 12 U.S. Counties

    America’s mismatch between wages and rental prices is more perverse than ever.

  3. A house with two cars is pictured.
    Equity

    It's Time to Change How We Measure Affordable Housing

    A cheap home isn’t affordable if it comes with high transportation costs.

  4. Equity

    The Poverty Just Over the Hills From Silicon Valley

    The South Coast, a 30-mile drive from Palo Alto, is facing an affordable-housing shortage that is jeopardizing its agricultural heritage.

  5. A new apartment rises in Cleveland's University Circle neighborhood, one of the region's major job hubs.
    POV

    One Key to a Rust Belt Comeback: Job Hubs

    Cleveland is looking to make inclusive growth attainable by connecting jobs to people and people to jobs.