A designer in Milan creates mobile mini-parks.

Would you be willing to sacrifice your parking space for a little piece of urban green space? Designer and ‘creative problem solver’ Matteo Cibic is hoping to persuade you with his current experiment the Tree Trolley. It's a modular and mobile mini-park that takes over the city’s empty parking spaces.

Cibic, who’s lived in Milan for a decade now, says he has yet to find a suitable shading tree to sit under–not entirely surprising considering the city’s lack of public green spaces. Cibic’s Tree Trolley allows for a mobile parklet that can be parked in any urban parking space, while also servicing the community. The benefits of the urban trolley are great, reducing urban smog by replacing private hotspots with one operating wifi hotspot that can be accessed by everyone in the area.

The trolley and can serve as a mobile work space–it’s equipped with a USB charger–while also making neighborhoods safe by providing light and help buttons. The ideal situation for Cibic’s rentable Tree Trolley is to split the costs amongst neighborhoods, creating a network of mobile green spaces for residents to enjoy. Read more about the project over at smart urban stage, plus a Q&A with Cibic and Inhabitat founder/editor Jill Fehrenbacher.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

 

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