Alisa Andrasek and Jose Sanchez

A new piece of interactive design invites community participation.

Simply put, “BLOOM” is a feast for the eyes. The pavilion, which was commissioned by the Greater London Authority for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games, is a spiraling neon Olympic-sanctioned pink structure constructed of individual pieces that can be reconfigured into an array of new shapes. Designed by Alisa Andrasek and Jose Sanchez from the Bartlett School of Architecture at UCL, the modular pavilion was conceived as an “urban toy” capable of fostering ”collective act[s] of imagination, search and play.”

Each of the thousand pieces which make up BLOOM can be removed from one section to be added elsewhere; while initially negligible, these small localized changes become apparent as the community engages more and more with the object. The “cells” are identical in form, but are flexible and notched with various connection points so as to allow participants to dramatically manipulate the overall form. Users may even “seed” portions of the structure to the ground to tease out functional (and not-so functional) opportunities, such as urban furniture.

BLOOM will be open August 28 in Trafalgar Square, where it will stand through the duration of the Paralympic Games and beyond, ending its run October 9.

[via creative applications]

All images copyright Alisa Andrasek and Jose Sanchez.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. POV

    Why the Future Looks Like Pittsburgh

    The city’s rise as a global innovation city reflects decades of investment in emerging technology, a new Brookings report says.

  2. Life

    The History of Sears Predicts Nearly Everything Amazon Is Doing

    One hundred years ago, a retail giant that shipped millions of products by mail moved swiftly into the brick-and-mortar business, changing it forever. Is that happening again?

  3. Life

    Where New York City Is Going Next

    In part two of our interview with Dan Doctoroff, the former deputy mayor of economic development and current CEO of Sidewalk Labs shares his thoughts on zoning, transportation, technology, and President Trump.

  4. Homes in Detroit are pictured.
    Equity

    How Housing Intensifies the Racial Wealth Gap

    The wealth of black families lags far behind whites, and housing markets play a key role.

  5. Charts

    The Evolution of Urban Planning in 10 Diagrams

    A new exhibit from the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association showcases the simple visualizations of complex ideas that have changed how we live.