Alisa Andrasek and Jose Sanchez

A new piece of interactive design invites community participation.

Simply put, “BLOOM” is a feast for the eyes. The pavilion, which was commissioned by the Greater London Authority for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games, is a spiraling neon Olympic-sanctioned pink structure constructed of individual pieces that can be reconfigured into an array of new shapes. Designed by Alisa Andrasek and Jose Sanchez from the Bartlett School of Architecture at UCL, the modular pavilion was conceived as an “urban toy” capable of fostering ”collective act[s] of imagination, search and play.”

Each of the thousand pieces which make up BLOOM can be removed from one section to be added elsewhere; while initially negligible, these small localized changes become apparent as the community engages more and more with the object. The “cells” are identical in form, but are flexible and notched with various connection points so as to allow participants to dramatically manipulate the overall form. Users may even “seed” portions of the structure to the ground to tease out functional (and not-so functional) opportunities, such as urban furniture.

BLOOM will be open August 28 in Trafalgar Square, where it will stand through the duration of the Paralympic Games and beyond, ending its run October 9.

[via creative applications]

All images copyright Alisa Andrasek and Jose Sanchez.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. The Presidio Terrace neighborhood
    POV

    The Problem of Progressive Cities and the Property Tax

    The news that a posh San Francisco street was sold for delinquent taxes exposes the deeper issue with America’s local revenue system.

  2. "Gift Horse"—a skeletal sculpture of a horse by artist Hans Haacke—debuted on the Fourth Plinth in London's Trafalgar Square in 2015.
    Design

    What To Do With Baltimore's Empty Confederate Statue Plinths?

    Put them to work, Trafalgar Square style.

  3. POV

    Grenfell Was No Ordinary Accident

    The catastrophic fire that killed at least 80 in London was the inevitable byproduct of an ideology that vilified the poor.

  4. Times Square, 1970.
    Life

    The New York That Belonged to the City

    Hyper-gentrification turned renegade Manhattan into plasticine playground. Can the city find its soul again?

  5. Equity

    The Geography of Hate in the U.S.

    Where hate groups operate now.