Hundreds of walkers get decked out in glowing lights and run over Arthur's Seat to illuminate the iconic landmark.

What was once a side show has become the biggest arts festival in the world. The Edinburgh Fringe Festival brings thousands of performers to the city to present "shows for every taste."

The festival, now in its 65th year, comes with a couple of annual traditions. Every year, hundreds of runners dress up in glowing lights and participate in a "mass choreographed act of walking and running over Arthur's Seat in the center of Edinburgh to illuminate the iconic landmark."

Below, photos of the run, by Reuters photographer David Moir.

Participants taking part in NVA's Speed of Light run during performance on Arthurs Seat at Edinburgh International Festival in Edinburgh.
Runners taking part in NVA's Speed of Light walk across path before taking part in performance on Arthurs Seat.
People watch the NVA's Speed of Light performance on Arthurs Seat.
Runners taking part in NVA's Speed of Light create visual display with their light suits during performance on Arthurs Seat.

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