Communities across the world remember and agitate for changes to nuclear regulations.

Sixty-seven years ago, America dropped its atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Yesterday, communities in Japan and around the world came together to remember and reflect. In Hiroshima, Shigeaki Mori and Clifton Truman Daniel met for the first time. Mori was seven-years-old when the bomb was dropped. Daniel is the grandson of President Harry Truman. According to Stars and Stripes: 

On Monday, the two men met as Hiroshima marked the 67th anniversary of the Aug. 6, 1945, bombing — Truman Daniel drawn by a longing for reconciliation, and Mori driven by a decades-long mission to identify and honor 12 American prisoners of war who were among the 140,000 fatalities from the blast and its aftermath.

Shortly after tens of thousands of people gathered at the Peace Memorial Park to remember long-dead loved ones, Truman Daniel visited Mori, who spent his own time and money to erect a plaque nearby honoring the U.S. servicemen, whose own families didn’t know for decades they had died when a nuclear bomb was used as a weapon of destruction for the first time.

Meanwhile, over at In These Times, Noam Chumsky contemplates the current nuclear threats, wondering if Iran or India might be the next Hiroshima. "Progress is unlikely unless there is mass public support in the West," he writes. "Failure to grasp the opportunity will, once again, lengthen the grim shadow that has darkened the world since that fateful August 6."

Doves fly over the Peace Memorial Park with a view of the gutted atomic-bomb dome at a ceremony in Hiroshima, to mark the 67th anniversary of the atomic bombing on the city. (Reuters/Kyodo)
A woman prays for the victims of the 1945 atomic bombing, in the Peace Memorial Park. (Reuters/Kyodo)
People release paper lanterns on the Motoyasu river facing the gutted Atomic Bomb Dome. (Reuters/Kyodo)
A student with a painted face participates in a peace rally to commemorate the 67th anniversary of the atomic bombings of the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in Mumbai. (Reuters/Danish Siddiqui)
Protesters hold placards during a protest outside the Japanese Embassy in Manila to commemorate the 67th anniversary of the atomic bombing by the U.S. against the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. (Reuters/Romeo Ranoco)


 

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