Outside of Prague, a home that is able to move up and down and rotate on its sides.

Wouldn't it be nice if your windows could face the sun at all times? Or, perhaps, if your windows could switch directions at will, letting you change views when you got antsy or bored? Yes, of course it would. And Bohumil Lhota has designed a house that can literally do just that. According to Reuters:

Lhota conceptualized the idea to create the unique house and started to build it in 1981, building it close to nature to benefit from the cooler ground temperature. Lhota's house, which is built in 2002, is able to move up and down and rotate on its sides, which allows him to adjust to his preferred window view.

Below, pictures of the home, by Reuters photographer Petr Josek Snr.

Compination picture shows the vertical progression of a unique house built by 73-year-old Bohumil Lhota in Velke Hamry

Lhota, a 73-year-old builder, operates a mechanism that allows him to adjust the height of the house.


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