Reuters

Mass weddings, bears eating hearts, kissing contests and more.

Love is in the air across China, as lovebirds everywhere celebrated Qixi. The Qixi festival, also known as the Double Seven Festival, is the Chinese equivalent of Valentine's Day. Below, pictures of the festival.

A male orangutan rips off heart-shape stickers, used as decorations to celebrate the Qixi festival, and places them into its mouth at a zoo in Kunming. (Wong Campion/Reuters)



A girl looks at a figurine of a toy couple at a store prior to the Qixi festival in Huaibei.



Brides are carried while sitting inside sedan chairs during a group wedding ceremony to celebrate the Qixi festival in Yuncheng. (Reuters)



Paper cranes are hanged from an ancient city wall to celebrate the coming Qixi Festival in Nanjing. (Reuters)



Couples take part in a mass wedding ceremony during the Qixi festival in Chongqing municipality. (Reuters)



Lovers take part in a kissing contest to celebrate the Qixi festival in Huaying. (Reuters)


 

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