Turning the cityscape into a ninja playground is even more rad when dogs do it.

Parkour enthusiasts have been leaping and bounding over staircases and off the sides of buildings for years. This improvised urban sport is something like ninja skateboarding on the built environment, but without the skateboards and with a lot of tumbling practice. Groups of parkour practitioners all over the world have been turning the walls and roofs of buildings into urban training courses and jungle gyms. And now, dogs are doing it, too. Yes, really.

Meet TreT, an American Staffordshire Terrier from Ukraine known as the Parkour Dog. As this video shows, TreT is adept at jumping off of walls, climbing fences and doing sweet turnaround moves on building corners and tree trunks.

Kinda makes two-legged parkour people look a little lazy.

TreT's trainer has a whole channel of videos featuring this acrobatic dog, including this highlight reel inexplicably titled "TreT – The Best Lover."

And apparently TreT is not the only parkour dog out there. There's also this slightly less impressive video of a dog from Hawaii who likes to jump over stuff as well.

TreT's trainer has a website offering to share wisdom about how you, too, can train your dog in the acrobatic arts of parkour. Or maybe it's more like barkour! (Sorry, couldn't help myself).

Via Bobotown

Image courtesy YouTube user

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