Kirill Rudenko

Get a whiff of a place you miss.

Hurting for a sniff of pure Singapore? Czech artist Kirill Rudenko has you covered.

Rudenko has designed these charming cans of air from the world's cities. Each can contains local air he says "relieves stress, cures homesickness, and helps fighting nostalgia." We think these cans encourage nostalgia, but maybe that's just us.

A sample recipe, from a "supplier" in Paris:

20% The Louvre
20% Notre Dame
25% Eiffel Tower
15% Musée d'Orsay
10% Champs-Elysées
10% Sacre Coeur

ATTENTION! May contain traces of liberté, égalité and fraternité.

And a write-up on the recipe from Riga:

Get yourself a piece of the City to remember. Feeling down? Got the blues? Buy a whole box of Air and open the cans whenever you feel sad, remember the atmosphere, marvelous time you spent in Riga and feel better. Never been to Riga? Order your can online and begin your journey while still at home!

The Air of Riga is also a great gift for your friends and family. Forget the magnets, cups and plates. Bring home something everybody will love and ask questions about, and if anybody is suspicious, just open the can and let them feel the spirit of a thousand year old city.

Is it possible that Rudenko was inspired by my colleague Eric Jaffe's post in July on silly city souvenirs, which featured a can of fog from San Francisco? Either way, it's been way too long since we enjoyed the sweet smell of Berlin, and Rudenko's iterations, at $9.99 a can, are a fraction of the airfare.

h/t LaughingSquid

Top image: Kirill Rudenko/Etsy.

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