An easy-to-carry lounge chair can be deployed against buildings and trees.

Swiss studio Bernhard Burkard‘s clever design for a deck chair with no back legs might at first seem precarious, but the physics behind it is actually quite sturdy. The Curt deck chair consists of a fabric seat slung between a frame made of local ash and beech woods. The legs are also outfitted with anti-slip feet so that the chair can lean upon adjacent walls like a ladder. The frame is constructed by people with mental or physical disabilities at the Altra workshop in Schaffhausen, Switzerland.

With it’s practical simplicity, the chair is designed to harmonize with its environment. To find the most secure position, the frame should be leaned against walls or rails at a flat angle. The anti-slip legs allow for dependable utility on varying surfaces. Both comfortable and functional, the Curt deck chair provides an inventive seating solution that can be carried and deployed wherever desired.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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