Reuters

Two women tie the knot in the country's first same-sex Buddhist wedding.

Taiwan hosted its first same-sex Buddhist wedding this month.

You Ya-ting and Huang Mei-yu tied the knot after a seven-year courtship. The 30-year-old couple was wed at a ceremony in Toyuan county, northern Taiwan. According to Reuters, "they hope this wedding will help make Taiwan the first place in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage."

Huang Mei-yu (L) receives help from her friend to adjust the veil before taking a group photo as You Ya-ting looks on after their symbolic same-sex Buddhist wedding ceremony at a temple in Taoyuan. (Reuters/Pichi Chuang)
You Ya-ting (L) and Huang Mei-yu cast their stamps during their symbolic same-sex Buddhist wedding ceremony at a temple in Taoyuan county, northern Taiwan. (Reuters/Pichi Chuang)

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