Siba Sahabi

Sticks mimic the city's ancient, curvy skyline.

Istanbul, that wondrous metropolis that connects East and West across two continents, is famed for its intricate and evocative skyline, filled with minarets, domes, Ottoman mosques, and Byzantine turrets. Amsterdam-based designer Siba Sahabi has now created a series of candlesticks that pay homage to the sight of this ancient skyline. Made of felt, the candlesticks come in different hues to recreate the effect of light on stone and metal at dawn and dusk.

Sahabi wound strips of felt into flat disks which were then stacked, using a candlepin to hold them together. A major benefit of this technique is, of course, that wool does not burn. Evocatively photographed by Maayan Ben Gal, the candlesticks will be on display at MINT during the 2012 London Design Festival.

Photo credit: Bertl123 /Shutterstock

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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