KG'MG Architects

Watch your vibrations battle geometric forms thanks to the handiwork of two Ukrainian architects.

Have you ever imagined your body was emitting waves with every movement, disrupting the surrounding space and sometimes joining with the vibrations of those near you--and you could see it happening? Have you dreamed of thrashing around in a sea of geometry?

Ukrainian architects Iurii Kaygorodtsev and Andrii Mogylnyi, of the firm KG'MG, have designed a cool exhibit called "Adaptive Architecture" at the Kiev National University of Construction and Architecture that makes those trips into reality. KG'MG usually do wild stuff with parametric architecture in their architecture and interior design projects, and this is no exception. As museum-goers explore the stone floor, projected forms leap away and encircle them like a school of fish disrupted by a shark.

For those of you who would like to try this at home, the piece is accompanied by a lecture on the computer programming and mechanical innovation that make it possible.

Video and image courtesy of KG'MG Architects.

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