Long popular in Europe, these designs are gaining a foothold in America and beyond.

Sure, they provide shelter from the elements—but roofs can be so much more! Here, we profile 10 remarkable living roofs around the globe, from Brussels to Vancouver.

Long popular in Europe, green roofs are gaining a sturdy foothold in the U.S. and beyond. A recent survey by Green Roofs for Health Cities shows that the green roof square footage has grown 115 percent since 2009. Increasingly, owners of all building types, from single-family dwellings to giant commercial complexes, are recognizing the economical and environmental payoffs of living roofs. And what about those aesthetic benefits! Who doesn’t love a gorgeous, verdant roof?

To learn more about green roofs, consider attending the GRHC’s 10th annual “Cities Alive” conference in Chicago from October 17-20. In the meantime, enjoy our slide show.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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