Be Open

Be OPEN reminds us that public art doesn't have to be visual.

The Be OPEN Sound Portal was created for this year’s London Design Festival, and is situated in the middle of Trafalgar Square, one of London’s busiest public spaces. The pavilion seeks to provide an aural sanctuary from all the hustle and bustle, and to show that designers should not just focus on the visual. Designed by Arup and commissioned by Sound and Music (SAM), the Sound Portal featured work from five sound artists over the course of the design festival, with pieces ranging from glacier sounds to electronica. Read more.

The pavilion is part of a larger project by the think tank BE OPEN, which set out to create installations focusing on each of the five senses. After the design festival, the pavilion will be installed at Chelsea College of Art and Design, and will feature sound works by students.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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