Reuters

Parkour around the globe.

Parkour was invented in France in the 1980s. But the sport, which involves slithering, jumping, and climbing your way through a cityscape, has spread around the world. Below, practitioners the world over:

Free-runner Asid (real name Yusuf Yirtici) demonstrates a free-running somersault in front of the London Eye in London. Freerun, is based on the theory of Parkour, which uses the body to get from A to B as quickly and efficiently as possible, but its practitioners place greater emphasis on individual expression, creative flow and artistic merit. (Luke MacGregor/Reuters)
Palestinian youths practice their parkour skills in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip. Some youths, aged between 12 and 23 years old, in Gaza are training in parkour which was developed in France. Parkour is a physical discipline of movement focused on overcoming obstacles. Training is held in cemeteries, and in former Israeli settlements. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)



A member of the Street Show PK Club shows his parkour skills at a park in Hangzhou. (Steven Shi/Reuters)
A youth practices parkour, also known as free-running, as he performs a somersault in the city of Netanya. (Amir Cohen/Reuters)



Palestinian youths practice their parkour skills in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

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