Vimeo/FidiGlobal

You don't need a wealthy developer when you've got thousands of small investors.

The largest buildings in the world have come to exist through the pocketbooks of very rich people. But industrialists and oil sheikhs shouldn't be the only ones who can scrape the sky. A new crowd-sourced financing model out of Colombia shows that regular Joes – in sufficient quantities – can fund their own megatall building.

The BD Bacatá in downtown Bogotá is a proposed $240 million, 66-story skyscraper. Instead of relying on one developer, the project is being funded through a sale of shares in the building. More than 3,000 people have invested, raising more than $145 million. When completed in 2014, it will be the tallest building in Columbia.

The share model – known as FiDis and being pushed by a group called FiDi Global – has been used before to fund and divide ownership for other projects in Colombia, including clubs, amusement parks and hotels.

This promotional video explains:

via PSFK

Image courtesy Vimeo user

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  2. MapLab

    Introducing MapLab

    A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

  3. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  4. Equity

    The Story Behind the Housing Meme That Swept the Internet

    How a popular meme about neoliberal capitalism and fast-casual architecture owned itself.

  5. Transportation

    Europe's Intercity Bus Juggernaut Is Rolling Into the U.S.

    Flixbus is like the Uber of long-haul road travel. Could it reboot the American coach business?