Vimeo/FidiGlobal

You don't need a wealthy developer when you've got thousands of small investors.

The largest buildings in the world have come to exist through the pocketbooks of very rich people. But industrialists and oil sheikhs shouldn't be the only ones who can scrape the sky. A new crowd-sourced financing model out of Colombia shows that regular Joes – in sufficient quantities – can fund their own megatall building.

The BD Bacatá in downtown Bogotá is a proposed $240 million, 66-story skyscraper. Instead of relying on one developer, the project is being funded through a sale of shares in the building. More than 3,000 people have invested, raising more than $145 million. When completed in 2014, it will be the tallest building in Columbia.

The share model – known as FiDis and being pushed by a group called FiDi Global – has been used before to fund and divide ownership for other projects in Colombia, including clubs, amusement parks and hotels.

This promotional video explains:

via PSFK

Image courtesy Vimeo user

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. New public notice signs from Atlanta's Department of City Planning.
    Design

    Atlanta's Planning Department Makeover

    A new seal, a new name, and most importantly, new signs that people will actually read.

  2. Times Square, 1970.
    Life

    The New York That Belonged to the City

    Hyper-gentrification turned renegade Manhattan into plasticine playground. Can the city find its soul again?

  3. POV

    Grenfell Was No Ordinary Accident

    The catastrophic fire that killed at least 80 in London was the inevitable byproduct of an ideology that vilified the poor.

  4. "Gift Horse"—a skeletal sculpture of a horse by artist Hans Haacke—debuted on the Fourth Plinth in London's Trafalgar Square in 2015.
    Design

    What To Do With Baltimore's Empty Confederate Statue Plinths?

    Put them to work, Trafalgar Square style.

  5. Maps

    This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix

    Just not always for the better: "I've deliberately designed maps that are deliberately horrible to look at, and succeeded."