A school celebrates its 10th anniversary with this architectural stunt.

Unadorned, hyper-functional dormitory architecture has its critics, but it can come in handy for large-scale performance art.

Behold this video created by NotSoNoisy artist Guillaume Raymond to celebrate the tenth anniversary of a Swiss health school, the Haute Ecole de Santé Vaud in Lausanne, Switzerland. The 55 bedrooms perform an array of different tricks for a freeze-frame camera. Fluttering shapes and patterns dance across the building facade.

At times, the precision of the display recalls computer animation -- but it's real, and it's the work of a team of hundreds of volunteers, whose off-screen efforts are the subject of the video's second half. They man the bedroom windows while Raymond barks instructions through a megaphone. Pretty low-tech, but it looks great.

Video and top image courtesy NotSoNoisy Guillaume Raymond.

H/T Laughing Squid

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