Waiting for the walk sign doesn't have to be boring.

Waiting at a crosswalk can seem like forever. Endless streams of cars pass by while you stand there, looking out anxiously at the red "stop" hand and pushing that little button on the streetpole that you're sure isn't even hooked up to anything. Minutes can pass by, and there you are, just standing there, staring out into the crossfire of car traffic. It can be a bit of a bore.  But it doesn't have to be.

Students of digital media design at HAWK University in Hildesheim, Germany, have designed this concept for a game pedestrians can play while they wait for the walk sign. It's a pole-mounted touchscreen featuring the classic video game Pong, and pedestrians on each side of the street can actually play against each other.

The video below shows how the streetside game could work. The dialogue is in German, but you'll get the picture.

It's not actually a real installation, as these making-of photos show, but it's a pretty cool idea for adding a little fun into the urban street infrastructure.

via urbanshit.de

Image courtesy Vimeo user

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    Venice Mayor to Tourists: Stop Whining and Pay Up

    British visitors were overcharged for lunch, the U.K. press pounced, and now everyone is mad.

  2. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  3. Life

    From the Ruins of a Retail Meltdown, Post-Industrial Playgrounds Emerge

    While its shuttered department stores cause headaches around the U.S., Sears’s massive 1920s warehouses represent a triumph of post-industrial urbanism.

  4. Equity

    The Story Behind the Housing Meme That Swept the Internet

    How a popular meme about neoliberal capitalism and fast-casual architecture owned itself.

  5. Navigator

    The Gentrification of City-Based Sitcoms

    How the future ‘Living Single’ reboot can reclaim the urban narrative ‘Friends’ ran off with.