Biomorphis

The proposed park bridges two sides of an old elevated railway, creating a more direct route across town.

It looks like Edinburgh may soon have its very own High Line. Designed by innovative architecture firm Biomorphis, the Leith Walk bridges two sides of an old elevated railway that is being rehabilitated as a pedestrian walkway and park. The project plans to make the railway whole once again to create a green belt that will give walkers and bikers a safe and fast commute across town. The project aims to reinvent the city’s landscape, lower fossil fuel dependency, and clear traffic by using infrastructure that Edinburgh already has.

Known as an industrial city, Edinburgh can begin its eco-friendly makeover with the Leith Walk. While most of the Caledonian Railway sits above the city untouched, a bridge must be built to connect its two main routes. Biomorphis wants the bridge to not only be made with locally sourced materials, but also constructed by local artisans on location.



A simple, repetitive design comprised of interlocking modules melds in with the urbanscape, while creating a rustic, simple feeling on the pathway. Locals can even begin to grow their own gardens along the walk or underneath in newly designated green areas. The Leith Walk’s end goal is to revitalize a bustling city with a clean, lightweight, convenient structure that incorporates the town’s history while bringing it into the future.

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All photos via Biomorphis

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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