Biomorphis

The proposed park bridges two sides of an old elevated railway, creating a more direct route across town.

It looks like Edinburgh may soon have its very own High Line. Designed by innovative architecture firm Biomorphis, the Leith Walk bridges two sides of an old elevated railway that is being rehabilitated as a pedestrian walkway and park. The project plans to make the railway whole once again to create a green belt that will give walkers and bikers a safe and fast commute across town. The project aims to reinvent the city’s landscape, lower fossil fuel dependency, and clear traffic by using infrastructure that Edinburgh already has.

Known as an industrial city, Edinburgh can begin its eco-friendly makeover with the Leith Walk. While most of the Caledonian Railway sits above the city untouched, a bridge must be built to connect its two main routes. Biomorphis wants the bridge to not only be made with locally sourced materials, but also constructed by local artisans on location.



A simple, repetitive design comprised of interlocking modules melds in with the urbanscape, while creating a rustic, simple feeling on the pathway. Locals can even begin to grow their own gardens along the walk or underneath in newly designated green areas. The Leith Walk’s end goal is to revitalize a bustling city with a clean, lightweight, convenient structure that incorporates the town’s history while bringing it into the future.

\

All photos via Biomorphis

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a sign advertising public parking next to a large building
    Equity

    U.S. Mayors Say Infrastructure Is a Priority. But What Kind?

    The Menino Survey of Mayors identifies priorities like infrastructure, traffic safety, and climate change. But many mayors aren’t eager to challenge the status quo.

  2. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  3. photo: Developer James Rouse visiting Harborplace in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
    Life

    What Happened to Baltimore’s Harborplace?

    The pioneering festival marketplace was among the most trendsetting urban attractions of the last 40 years. Now it’s looking for a new place in a changed city.

  4. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

  5. photo: NYC subway
    Transportation

    Behind the Gains in U.S. Public Transit Ridership

    Public transportation systems in the United States gained passengers over the second and third quarters of 2019. But the boost came from two large cities.

×