Reuters

Scenes from around the country.

It's no 4th of July, but Labor Day comes with its own traditions. Below, scenes from commutes, fresh-water surfs, and amusement parks.

Competitors race towards the shore of Lake Michigan during the pro surf paddling competition. This event brings fresh water surf enthusiasts from all over the region to Sheboygan over Labor Day weekend. (Sara Stathas/Reuters)
The cyclone on Coney Island. Photo courtesy of Bob Jagendorf/Flickr
The New York subway on Labor Day. Photo by Alan Light/Flickr
Labor day travelers watch a plume of thick smoke rises from the hills above San Gabriel mountains in the Angeles National Forest, California, along Highway 39 on Azusa Canyon. Evacuations have been ordered in the surrounding areas as the fire has burned more than 3,600 acres with only 5 percent containment as of 9:00 pm (PST), according to the Angeles National Forest Department. (Gene Blevins/Reuters)

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