Velepresso

Velepresso grinds and heats your morning joe while you ride.

Wouldn’t it be great if you could get your morning coffee without facing the grumpy, under-caffeinated masses in your local cafe? What if someone rode up on your bloc and prepared the perfect espresso street side? Coffee-heads rejoice, as a magical mobile brew has come to life in London. Amos Field Reid and Lasse Oiva, two graduates from the Royal College of Art in London have created the Velopresso, a bike-meets-coffee house that serves high quality joe on the go!

The Velopresso is essentially a pedal-powered coffee machine. The rider can switch gears to alternate powering the bike or the attached coffee grinder. A portable gas canister heats water on a tiny boiler, allowing for the perfect sized pour. While the design has already caught the eye of Deutsche Bank and Italian design house (and assumed espresso fans) Pininfarina, the Velopresso is still working on ways to continue its innovation by converting old coffee grounds to fuel. Lets cross our fingers for the coffee cart of the future!

 

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    Meet the 26-Year-Old Mayor Taking On Jeff Sessions

    Michael Tubbs on being singled out by the DOJ, and his plan turn his city around.

  2. Equity

    How Baltimore Removed Its Confederate Monuments Overnight

    For a city dogged by violence and unrest, this was a big deal.

  3. Life

    Can Craft Breweries Transform America's Post-Industrial Neighborhoods?

    A new study tells the story of craft beer’s astonishing rise and geographic clustering.

  4. Transportation

    New York City Could Finally Try Congestion Pricing

    Here’s how a governor-backed plan could win this time around.

  5. Skyscrapers tower over Singapore's historic Chinatown.
    Economic Development

    How Do You Measure the Value of a Historic Site?

    Debates over historic preservation often run into a problem: There’s plenty of data to support economic arguments, and much less to address questions of cultural value. A research team in Singapore wants to change that.