Velepresso

Velepresso grinds and heats your morning joe while you ride.

Wouldn’t it be great if you could get your morning coffee without facing the grumpy, under-caffeinated masses in your local cafe? What if someone rode up on your bloc and prepared the perfect espresso street side? Coffee-heads rejoice, as a magical mobile brew has come to life in London. Amos Field Reid and Lasse Oiva, two graduates from the Royal College of Art in London have created the Velopresso, a bike-meets-coffee house that serves high quality joe on the go!

The Velopresso is essentially a pedal-powered coffee machine. The rider can switch gears to alternate powering the bike or the attached coffee grinder. A portable gas canister heats water on a tiny boiler, allowing for the perfect sized pour. While the design has already caught the eye of Deutsche Bank and Italian design house (and assumed espresso fans) Pininfarina, the Velopresso is still working on ways to continue its innovation by converting old coffee grounds to fuel. Lets cross our fingers for the coffee cart of the future!

 

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    A History of the American Public Library

    A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

  2. Design

    The Curious Politics of a Montreal Mega-Mall

    The car-dependent suburb it’ll be built in wants to greenlight Royalmount against the city government’s wishes but it needs them to pay for the public infrastructure.

  3. Multicolored maps of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Tampa, denoting neighborhood fragmentation
    Equity

    Urban Neighborhoods, Once Distinct by Race and Class, Are Blurring

    Yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods.

  4. Equity

    Berlin Builds an Arsenal of Ideas to Stage a Housing Revolution

    The proposals might seem radical—from banning huge corporate landlords to freezing rents for five years—but polls show the public is ready for something dramatic.

  5. Design

    There’s a Tile Theft Epidemic in Lisbon

    With a single azulejo fetching hundreds of euros at the city’s more reputable antique stores, these tiles, sitting there out in the open, are easy pickings.