Beijing's $700 million Gate of the East has been attracting attention for its resemblance to a certain sartorial item.

It seems as if the designers of China’s new Gate to the East skyscraper have made a very expensive oversight. The $700 million building meant to embody an enormous archway looks more like a giant pair of pants. The 74-story design was supposed to be a dramatic architectural feat for the Chinese city of Suzhou, likening itself to the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. However, many are noticing the skyscraper’s unusual stance is attracting a different kind of international attention. Thousands have commented over the past several weeks saying that the structure looks like a pair of long-johns, boxers shorts, or even footed pajamas with the two base buildings on the bottom acting as feet. Similar things were said about OMA’s CCTV Tower (aka “Big Shorts”), but whereas in Beijing you have to squint to catch the supposed likeness, the affinity between RMJM’s design to the lower abdomen is uncanny.

The brainchild of british firm RMJM, the scraper is expected to be buttoned up by the end of the year.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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