Kingyobu

A Japanese artist fills an old phone booth with water and goldfish, to the delight of passers-by.

These days telephone booths are pretty much obsolete. Instead of letting them slowly decay on the city sidewalks, an artist collaborative called Kingyobu in Osaka is converting them into giant goldfish aquariums. The shimmery orange fish is somewhat of a good luck charm in Japan, so visitors crowd around the awesome tanks and get their luck and happiness fill

Kingyobu loosely translates to “goldfish club” in English. The group’s transformation turns rusty old phone booths around the city into a fun and simple art installation for everyone to enjoy for free.



All photos courtesy of Kingyobu

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Altantic partner site.

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