Kingyobu

A Japanese artist fills an old phone booth with water and goldfish, to the delight of passers-by.

These days telephone booths are pretty much obsolete. Instead of letting them slowly decay on the city sidewalks, an artist collaborative called Kingyobu in Osaka is converting them into giant goldfish aquariums. The shimmery orange fish is somewhat of a good luck charm in Japan, so visitors crowd around the awesome tanks and get their luck and happiness fill

Kingyobu loosely translates to “goldfish club” in English. The group’s transformation turns rusty old phone booths around the city into a fun and simple art installation for everyone to enjoy for free.



All photos courtesy of Kingyobu

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Altantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    Women Are Marching Again, But It's Not About Donald Trump

    In its second year, the Women’s March that dominated the nation's capital last January has decentralized, focusing on local issues in cities large and small.

  2. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.

  3. Transportation

    How Toronto Turned an Airport Rail Failure Into a Commuter Asset

    The Union Pearson Express launched with expensive rides and low ridership. Now, with fares slashed in half and a light rail connection in the works, it’s a legitimate transit alternative for workers.

  4. Transportation

    The Automotive Liberation of Paris

    The city has waged a remarkably successful effort to get cars off its streets and reclaim walkable space. But it didn’t happen overnight.

  5. Transportation

    On Paris Metro, Drug Abuse Reaches a Boiling Point

    The transit workers’ union says some stations on Line 12 are too dangerous to stop at. What will the city do?