Reuters

In Tokyo, an artist creates sculpture with old toys, plastic and wire.

Artist Hiroshi Fuji creates art that explores society through stuff. At his latest exhibit, Fuji displays toys he's collected over 13 years, tied together with plastic and wire. Called "Central Kaeru Station - where have all these toys come from," the exhibition runs until Sunday.

Below, pictures of the exhibit.

A boy looks at an artwork made of unwanted toys. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

A child runs past an artwork "Toy Saurus" made of unwanted toys at the solo exhibition of Japanese artist Hiroshi Fuji, in Tokyo. (Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters)
A girl plays on an artwork made of unwanted toys at the solo exhibition of Japanese artist Hiroshi Fuji, in Tokyo. (Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters
Mickey mouse toys are displayed as artwork made of unwanted toys at the solo exhibition of Japanese artist Hiroshi Fuji, in Tokyo. (Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. An aerial photo of downtown Miami.
    Life

    The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

    Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

  2. Transportation

    New York City’s MTA Tries a New Role: Suburban Developer

    The largest transit agency in the U.S. is building a mixed-use development next to a commuter rail station north of Manhattan.

  3. a photo of a BYD-built electric bus.
    Transportation

    A Car-Centric City Makes a Bid for a Better Bus System

    Indianapolis is set to unveil a potentially transformative all-electric bus rapid transit line, along with a host of major public transportation upgrades.

  4. a photo of a tiny house in Oregon
    Design

    How Amazon Could Transform the Tiny House Movement

    Could the e-commerce giant help turn small-home living from a niche fad into a national housing solution?

  5. Warren Logan
    Transportation

    A City Planner Makes a Case for Rethinking Public Consultation

    Warren Logan, a Bay Area transportation planner, has new ideas about how to truly engage diverse communities in city planning. Hint: It starts with listening.

×