Reuters

In Tokyo, an artist creates sculpture with old toys, plastic and wire.

Artist Hiroshi Fuji creates art that explores society through stuff. At his latest exhibit, Fuji displays toys he's collected over 13 years, tied together with plastic and wire. Called "Central Kaeru Station - where have all these toys come from," the exhibition runs until Sunday.

Below, pictures of the exhibit.

A boy looks at an artwork made of unwanted toys. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

A child runs past an artwork "Toy Saurus" made of unwanted toys at the solo exhibition of Japanese artist Hiroshi Fuji, in Tokyo. (Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters)
A girl plays on an artwork made of unwanted toys at the solo exhibition of Japanese artist Hiroshi Fuji, in Tokyo. (Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters
Mickey mouse toys are displayed as artwork made of unwanted toys at the solo exhibition of Japanese artist Hiroshi Fuji, in Tokyo. (Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters)

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