AZC

A design for an inflatable bridge at the foot of the Eiffel Tower.

Thank AZC for bringing you childhood dreams to life–well, sort of. The architects have designed an inflatable bridge at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, combining the nostalgia and functional play of moon bounces with pragmatic urban concerns (and it might just be the perfect contender for the Architizer A+ Awards Urban Transformation category). Realized in response to ArchTriumph’s ‘Bridge in Paris’ competition, the project invites visitors to engage in a more playful navigation through the City of Romance.

The design, which is comprised of inflatable modules tethered together with wide trampolines, resembles more a child’s playground than a safe, engineering structure. Described as giant “life preservers”, the tubular rings consists of  expansive PVC membranes 30 meters in diameter, which, naturally, doubles as floating buoys. The three modules that make up the bridge are attached to each other by cords, creating a “self-supporting ensemble” that will (hopefully) hold lounging pedestrians securely in place. Okay, we get it– trampolines are fun, but we can’t help but imagine being catapulted over the air-filled arches and into the less-than-clean water that fills the Seine. So much for romance.


All photos courtesy of AZC

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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