Privacy Pop

Many city dwellers might not realize they need a bed tent. They're probably correct.

You got to give credit to the inventor of the "Privacy Pop" for taking a tent, turning it upside down and selling it as a whole new product for $149.95.

Many city dwellers might not realize they need such a bed tent. But oh, wait until you see what this puppy can do. According to its makers in Orange, California, the Pop is masterfully engineered for:

- Kids and teenagers of all ages that have to share a room with their siblings.

- College students living in dorm rooms with one or more roommates.

- People who share a room with others in order to save cash off the cost of rent.

- Anyone who wants to keep the blindingly bright sunshine out of their eyes after a late night out.

The portable cocoon also is great for "[l]istening to your iPod or reading without bothering anyone else in the room," because Christ! the sound of pages turning can just drive a body up the wall. It folds up to fit into a small carrying case, so you can build a virtual cave when sleeping with others in a motel.

As somebody who snoozes with a wad of pillows over his head, I can see the benefits of the Pop. Add a layer of foam insulation and you have the perfect refuge from the lights and clamor of the city. Not to mention the barrier against mosquitoes and rabid bats, if you sleep with the windows open.

But I also see flaws, the foremost being that erecting one of these tents sends the message that you find your roommate loud, prying or intolerable. (For misanthropes, this is a handy bonus.) There's also the size factor. It only goes up to full, which some couples might find cramped. But if you're spending hours each day quarantined inside a weird tent that's born for "As Seen On TV," chances are you're sleeping alone.

Here's how to pack your bed tent:

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