Jennifer Sage

A silver lining, New York style.

Welcome to the Downtown Black Out, where the food's going bad and the prices don't matter.

This sidewalk barbecue was the scene outside restauranteur Keith McNally's Balthazar, a French restaurant and bakery in New York's SoHo neighborhood.

Generally, an entree in Balthazar's mirrored, wood-paneled dining room will run you between $30 and $40. But today, there were three charcoal grills set up on the sidewalk, with Balthazar cooks doing a short-order fire sale of what we presume was meat that would have been spoiled by the lack of electricity and refrigeration in lower Manhattan.

Eyewitnesses reported that you could get a steak sandwich for $5.

Jennifer Sage

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