Unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.

Buried rivers make for some of the best urban exploration. They are, I think, the single most exciting part of the movement to rediscover what our cities looked like before they were cities. 

And now, cities are asking, what if suppressed natural history can be part of the environmentally conscious future? 

That is the premise of the somewhat mysterious, highly dramatic, and entirely compelling trailer for the forthcoming documentary Lost Rivers, written and directed by Montreal-based filmmaker Caroline Bâcle: 

Lost Rivers - OFFICIAL TRAILER from Catbird Productions on Vimeo

HT BLDGBLOG.

Top image: Flickr user stari4ek.

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