Unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.

Buried rivers make for some of the best urban exploration. They are, I think, the single most exciting part of the movement to rediscover what our cities looked like before they were cities. 

And now, cities are asking, what if suppressed natural history can be part of the environmentally conscious future? 

That is the premise of the somewhat mysterious, highly dramatic, and entirely compelling trailer for the forthcoming documentary Lost Rivers, written and directed by Montreal-based filmmaker Caroline Bâcle: 

Lost Rivers - OFFICIAL TRAILER from Catbird Productions on Vimeo

HT BLDGBLOG.

Top image: Flickr user stari4ek.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. An apartment building in Sacramento, California.
    Equity

    The American Housing Crisis Might Be Our Next Big Political Issue

    Several new advocacy groups have sprung up to push for better housing policies at the state and national level. Their first job: Communicating how significant the problem really is.

  2. Life

    Where Americans Are Moving for Work

    Most of the top cities are the usual suspects—but there’s something odd happening in Silicon Valley.

  3. POV

    It's Not Cool to Argue About Whether D.C. Is Cool

    Can increasingly unaffordable urban places have too many trendy restaurants and hipsters? Maybe that’s not the right question.

  4. Design

    'New York is Not a City of Alleys': A Film Location Scout's Pet Peeves

    Nick Carr, a New York City location scout, explains why "Ghostbusters" captured the city so well and what annoys him the most about certain directors

  5. Maps

    Inside the Massive U.S. 'Border Zone'

    All of Michigan, D.C., and a large chunk of Pennsylvania are part of the area where Border Patrol has expanded search and seizure rights. Here's what it means to live or travel there.