Reuters

The annual Clown Congress meets this week.

You've heard of moments of silence and sit-ins. But this week, hundreds of clowns got together for a 15-minute laugh off. It's all par for the course at the 17th International Clown Convention, themed peace through laughter. According to CNN:

They gathered at Mexico City's Mother's Monument and then set about laughing and guffawing for a full 15 minutes, hoping that a world with more laughter will have less time for violence.

"We held 'laugh for peace' to speak out against violent conflicts, especially the internal conflicts in Mexico. We don't want violence, and we hope we can make more people love peace and learn to smile more often," said Llantom, Chairman of the Mexico Clown Association.

Host city Mexico City is an ideal spot for the conference. According to CNN, there are about 10,000 people who make their living in Mexico as clowns, working festivals, carnivals and street parades. Below, some photos:

A clown fixes his nose as preparation for his performance at an international clown convention in Mexico City. (Tomas Bravo/Reuters)
Clowns laugh for fifteen minutes as they rally for peace during the 17th Latin American clown convention at the Mother Monument in Mexico City. (Edgard Garrido/Reuters)



Clowns laugh for fifteen minutes as they rally for peace during the 17th Latin American clown convention at the Mother Monument in Mexico City. (Edgard Garrido/Reuters)


A clown laughs with his colleagues after the annual International Clown Convention photograph in Mexico City. (Reuters)

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