Reuters

Over 80,000 Mennonites live in Mexico. They have their own educational system and do not participate in the government.

Mexico's small but growing Mennonite population lives largely outside the law. According to Reuters:

Over 80,000 Mennonites live in Mexico after they established themselves for the first time in the 1920s. Mennonites arrange their lives according to their religious beliefs; they have their own educational system and do not participate in the government or serve in the military. Their origins date back to Switzerland in the 16th century as part of the Reformation until a movement was founded by the Dutch priest Menno Simon who believed in a different interpretation of the scriptures, hence the name Mennonites, meaning "Followers of Menno."

Below, photos by Reuters.

Agricultural equipment, trucks and laundry are seen outside a home in the Mennonite community of Buenos Aires in the northern state of Chihuahua. (Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)
A woman sweeps a porch at the Mennonite community of Buenos Aires in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua.

(Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)

A girl plays on a swing at the Mennonite community of Buenos Aires in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua. (Reuters)
A girls holds a basket at a supermarket at the Mennonite community of Buenos Aires in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua. (Reuters)

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