Reuters

Over 80,000 Mennonites live in Mexico. They have their own educational system and do not participate in the government.

Mexico's small but growing Mennonite population lives largely outside the law. According to Reuters:

Over 80,000 Mennonites live in Mexico after they established themselves for the first time in the 1920s. Mennonites arrange their lives according to their religious beliefs; they have their own educational system and do not participate in the government or serve in the military. Their origins date back to Switzerland in the 16th century as part of the Reformation until a movement was founded by the Dutch priest Menno Simon who believed in a different interpretation of the scriptures, hence the name Mennonites, meaning "Followers of Menno."

Below, photos by Reuters.

Agricultural equipment, trucks and laundry are seen outside a home in the Mennonite community of Buenos Aires in the northern state of Chihuahua. (Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)
A woman sweeps a porch at the Mennonite community of Buenos Aires in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua.

(Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)

A girl plays on a swing at the Mennonite community of Buenos Aires in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua. (Reuters)
A girls holds a basket at a supermarket at the Mennonite community of Buenos Aires in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua. (Reuters)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

  2. Perspective

    Coronavirus Reveals Transit’s True Mission

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

  3. Coronavirus

    The Coronavirus Class Divide in Cities

    Places like New York, Miami and Las Vegas have a higher share of the workforce in jobs with close proximity to others, putting them at greater Covid-19 risk.

  4. A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.
    Equity

    The Geography of Coronavirus

    What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

  5. photo: South Korean soldiers attempt to disinfect the sidewalks of Seoul's Gagnam district in response to the spread of COVID-19.
    Coronavirus

    Pandemics Are Also an Urban Planning Problem

    Will COVID-19 change how cities are designed? Michele Acuto of the Connected Cities Lab talks about density, urbanization and pandemic preparation.  

×