Geraldo Zamproni

It's part of the city's annual "art in odd places" exhibit.

It’s October, which means, for those of us in New York City, it’s time to start keeping our eyes peeled for Art in Odd Places (AiOP). An action group led by artists, Art in Odd Places was first introduced to the city in 2005 as a "response to the dwindling of public space and personal civil liberties." Every October, AiOP produces a festival, which runs along 14th Street in Manhattan from Avenue C to the Hudson River, with visual and performance art. This year, as a part of the annual AiOP festivities, Brazilian artist Geraldo Zamproni has placed incarnations of his "Volatile Structure" series "at large" throughout the city. Don’t worry; if you haven’t heard of Zamproni’s installations before, the giant red inflatable pillows are kind of hard to miss!

This is not Zamproni’s first experience with such pillow installations. The red inflatables have appeared everywhere from Brazil to Spain, as well as in countless museums. While AiOP hasn’t revealed the locations of Zamproni’s inflatables, sources at CollabCubed have allegedly spotted one such pillow sitting between Avenues B and C. Even if the folks at AiOP are playing coy — creating a kind of treasure hunt — like we said before: spotting a giant red inflatable pillow on the street shouldn’t be too hard.



“Volatile Structure” at the Granada Millennium Biennale

Photos: courtesy of Geraldo Zamproni

[via collabcubed]

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