Philip Stockton

It might take a minute to figure out that something's wrong with this short film.

It might take a minute to figure out something's wrong with this short film about New York. Some buildings beam in the reflected rays of the sun. Others seem to have incurred a strange kind of power outage that left their facades black as night, as if the universe decided not to direct photons in that location that day.

The monochromatic mashup is the result of filming the same locations at different times of the day, then combining the footage digitally with the kind of rotoscoping techniques used in movies like Richard Linklater's A Scanner Darkly. Director Philip Stockton used a combination of time-lapse and animation to complete this cockeyed look at the big city, which he says "explores the relationships between night and day."

If you're wondering about locations, here they are:

1. Weehawken Waterfront Park, New Jersey
2. Dream Hotel, Midtown
3. Manhattan River Bridge, East River
4. South 1st Street, Williamsburg
5. East 1st Street, East Village
6. East Broadway, Chinatown
7. The Reservoir, Central Park
8. East 2nd Street, East Village
9. Macneil Park, College Point
10. East Houston Street, East Village
11. Williamsburg Bridge, Lower East Side
12. Skillman Avenue, Williamsburg

About the Author

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