Tom Ryaboi

An elevated view of the Canadian city.

This new time-lapse video is distinctly the work of Toronto photographer Tom Ryaboi, a.k.a. @R00ftopper.

Eric Jaffe interviewed Ryaboi on the site back in February, and the photographer explained how he uses disguises to infiltrate buildings and get photos over the edges of the roof. His greatest fear? Public speaking.

In this timelapse, "City Rising," Ryaboi takes to the roofs again. Up there, watching the camera click away, he writes in the description of this video that the mind tends to wander:

Over and above all the technical challenges — motion control gear, constantly changing light, aperture flicker — shooting a timelapse forces you to look inside: after setting up your shot, there’s often not much you can do for hours, but sit up there and ponder while the camera does it's thing. The relationship between the cold glass, steel and concrete below coupled with the often majestic clouds, sky and sun/moon never ceases to be a source of wonder. And so the purpose of what you’re doing becomes a frequent question in your mind.

Look out for the Rogers Center closing at 3:25:

City Rising from Tom Ryaboi on Vimeo.

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